Skrevet av Emne: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned  (Lest 10838 ganger)

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jarle

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LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« på: November 25, 2007, 10:51:20 »
Meget hyggelig oppladning til dagens kamp...
DON REVIE what a man!!!

Damned United... For et kongelag...
Det er bare en ting som plager meg med denne GLORY perioden...det er antall 2 plasser.
Og at vi blir beskyldt for bestikkelser.
FY FANE!!! hører ingen nevne Milano dommeren eller ranet i Serievinnercupen i 74
eller alle de andre dommertabbene som fratokk oss titler!!!

Har noen nevnt noe om SCUM som spiller 15 tilleggsminutter hver gang de ligger under eller det miraklet at de spilte 80-90 kamper på rad på Old Trafford uten et straffespark til motstanderlaget... Men det er jo bare typisk flaks ikke sant!!!

http://football.guardian.co.uk/News_Story/0,,2216845,00.html
Vi må jo bare vinne på en slik dag!!!



The king of the damned

30 years after Don Revie left the game in England, is it time to reassess the legacy of one of football's most divisive figures?

James Corbett
Observer Sport Monthly, Sunday 25 November 2007

May 26, 1989: the day every football fan remembers. The last game, the last minute, the last kick of an epic season; Arsenal's Michael Thomas scores the goal that takes the First Division title away from Liverpool by securing a 2-0 victory at Anfield. It was, some say, the day that England began to love football again, after an era of hooliganism, tragedy and rough, unattractive football.

That same day, in an Edinburgh hospital, Don Revie, the former Leeds and England manager, passed away, aged just 61, his body ravaged by motor neurone disease. 'A friend of mine died yesterday, a big lovable bear of a man,' wrote the Daily Mail's Jeff Powell; other accolades seemed to be lost in the excitement following Arsenal's victory. Some commentators, in the aftermath of his death, even accused Revie of initiating English football's decline, by introducing 'professionalism' - the bone-crushing, win-at-all-costs football that brought his Leeds teams such success in the Sixties and Seventies and that had been taken up by other clubs.

At his funeral a week later, the Leeds players he had managed, now in their forties and fifties - Billy Bremner, Norman Hunter, Johnny Giles, Allan Clarke, Jack Charlton and all the rest of them - were out in force. Kevin Keegan flew in from Spain and Lawrie McMenemy, the former Southampton manager, was there too. But there was no one else from his England days, no one from the Football Association. When the new season began that August, there was no minute's silence, no black armbands. There was no indication that the man being mourned had been the most innovative manager of his generation.

Just as Clive Woodward and Bill Sweetenham have transformed rugby union and swimming with their unconventional approaches, so Revie changed the face of English football. He was a confidant to the players, psychologist, social secretary, kit designer, commercial manager, PR flak, dietitian and all-encompassing 'boss' of his team. In an era when pre-match preparation consisted of a 10-minute chat before a game, Revie was a revolutionary. Not until Arsene Wenger was appointed Arsenal boss in 1996, more than two decades after Revie had left Elland Road, would a manager exert such a profound influence on his club - and the English game as a whole.

Matt Busby was knighted for his success at Manchester United; Alf Ramsey for his with England. Bill Shankly, who also died relatively young, is quoted like some secular saint. Other managers of the era, such as Joe Mercer, Malcolm Allison and Bill Nicholson, are remembered with fondness and admiration. But although his successes outstrip those of most contemporaries, Revie has never been revered, or regarded with warmth. His reputation has been defined not by his feats at Elland Road, but by allegations of corruption and venality. Those allegations have rarely been challenged.

Donald George Revie was born on 10 July 1927 in Depression-stricken Middlesbrough. This was the town of JB Priestley's English Journey 'whose chief passions... were for beer and football'. It was, Priestley wrote, 'a dismal town, even with beer and football'. Revie's father was an unemployed joiner; his mother, a washerwoman, died when he was a child. Poverty and football defined his childhood. 'He used to talk about taking baths in the sink,' says Ernest Hecht, a friend and business associate of Revie from the 1960s. 'It was a poor upbringing and that left him determined that everything went well later on the monetary side.' At 14, Revie left school and began work as a bricklayer.

Growing up under the shadow of Ayresome Park, football was an escape. He idolised Middlesbrough players George Camsell and Wilf Mannion, and fell under the influence of Bill Sanderson, manager of a junior team, Middlesbrough Swifts. A train driver by day, Sanderson was obsessed with the minutiae of the game: in his council house he held team meetings, distributing dossiers on local rivals and showing a tactical nous that would have shamed many First Division clubs. His ideas left a deep impression on the young Revie.

Revie's breakthrough as a footballer came at 16, with Leicester City, initially playing in the wartime leagues. He joined Hull City in 1949 and Manchester City two years later. An intelligent but not especially quick player, he rose to prominence at Maine Road, developing a role as a deep-lying centre-forward, modelled on that of the great Hungarian player Nandor Hidegkuti. Revie won six England caps, the first of which came in late 1954 in the season in which he was named Footballer of the Year. In the next season, using the so-called 'Revie Plan', City won the FA Cup. But he was transferred to Sunderland in November 1956 and two years later, though he may not have recognised it at the time, came the crucial move in his career: a £14,000 transfer to Leeds.

Leeds were a mediocre team in the late 1950s: their only honour, the Second Division championship, had been won long ago in 1924 and their ramshackle ground, Elland Road, bore testament to the city's preference for rugby league. At the end of Revie's second season they were relegated to Division Two; in his third they neared bankruptcy, with crowds sometimes as low as 8,000. 'The club were fifth-rate and the players were undisciplined,' says Eric Smith, who was signed from Celtic in June 1960. 'I thought beforehand I was coming to a top club. I found out otherwise in the first three or four days.'

In March 1961, the Leeds directors gambled and appointed Revie, their 33-year-old captain, as manager. Revie had previously applied to be Bournemouth manager and asked Harry Reynolds, a Leeds director, to write his reference. While writing it, Reynolds was moved to consider him for the Leeds job - one that no one in their right minds wanted at the time. 'Overnight he had to make the transition from being one of the boys to being the boss,' recalled Billy Bremner, years later. 'The way he affected the transition is a mark of the man himself.' Revie called the squad together: he said he was no longer 'Don', nor 'Mr Revie', but 'Boss'. In the following years he would redefine the term.

That season Revie saved Leeds from relegation. The next, he began to transform them. His first task - after changing the colour of the kit from royal blue to all white to emulate Real Madrid, the all-conquering European champions, a comparison considered preposterous at the time - was to purge what he later called 'a dead club' of its rotten core. 'There were players here who didn't care whether they played or not,' he recalled in 1968. 'I got rid of 27 in two years.' But he stuck with underperformers, such as Bremner, who was unhappy playing in an unfamiliar outside-right role and homesick for his native Scotland, and Jack Charlton, 'a one-man awkward squad', nurturing their previously unrealised potential. Bremner was persuaded to stay, moved to a more central role and eventually became Revie's captain; the surly and undisciplined Charlton, previously an abysmal trainer, flourished under the new coaching regime, becoming the cornerstone of a young, tenacious defence. His play so improved that he became England's World Cup-winning centre-half. Revie combined their talents with astute signings such as the veteran inside-forward Bobby Collins, from Everton, and Manchester United's Johnny Giles.

One of his great managerial gifts was an ability to spot and nurture young talent. He inherited several outstanding teenage players, including Bremner, Paul Reaney, Gary Sprake and Norman Hunter, and added other unknowns such as Peter Lorimer and Terry Cooper to the squad. 'He was a great man, a father figure really,' says Sprake. Leeds' long-standing goalkeeper, who had never left Wales before joining Leeds, says that he was so homesick that he ran away back to his parents' home after just two weeks. The next morning Revie was on the doorstep, having driven through the night to persuade him to come back.

Revie watched more than what was happening at training. 'When you had a girlfriend,' Lorimer says, 'he'd have her checked out and make sure she was the right sort of person, in his opinion.' But Revie's loyalty could reach a more sinister level. In 1971 Sprake was involved in a drink-driving accident, seriously injuring a female passenger before fleeing the scene. When police turned up to arrest Sprake shortly after the crash, Revie intervened and the incident was covered up: the goalkeeper's car was reported stolen and he received a mere police censure instead of more serious charges.

At the training ground he introduced a regime that made Leeds the F***est and most technically proficient club in the Football League, including hiring ballet dancers to teach the players about balance and imposing dietary and nutritional standards. 'I laugh when I read about these foreign managers bringing in new ideas and new techniques,' says Revie's son Duncan, who points out that his father's initiatives predated the 1990s 'coaching revolution' by decades. 'His training ideas were ahead of their time,' Lorimer agrees. 'I know when we mixed with players from other clubs at internationals, none of them were doing the things we were. It was all new. Everything was ahead of its time and that's probably why we enjoyed it so much.'

Revie also created brotherly spirit among the squad. 'Our whole ethos was built on loyalty,' Lorimer says. 'We all fight for each other, we all work for each other. If someone kicks me, he kicks all 11 of us.' Revie involved the players' families, to heighten the sense of togetherness. He organised social nights for the players, including rounds of carpet bowls, dominos and bingo. 'We had 15 years of what no man gets,' Lorimer says. 'Every day you'd go to work and it was an absolute pleasure. You couldn't wait to get in your car and go down to the ground and be amongst the lads.'

Having won promotion to the First Division in 1964, Leeds finished runners-up in both the League and the FA Cup in their first season back, and over the next decade never finished lower than fourth. They took the title twice, in 1969 and 1974, and won the League Cup in 1968 and the FA Cup in 1972. In Europe, they won the Inter City Fairs Cup - the forerunner of the Uefa Cup - in 1968. 'It was a team that had everything,' Lorimer says. 'They had aggression. They had class. They had experience. It was the complete team, it had the perfect blend of players that offered every good part of the game.'

But Leeds' brand of football made them hated by many. It was a high-tempo pressing game that suffocated opponents and overwhelmed those that tried to outpass them. If your side tried to kick them, Leeds would kick back twice as hard. They feigned injuries, harassed officials and pinched, kicked and hit opponents. The image of 'Dirty Leeds' was reinforced on the terraces, where their supporters earned a reputation for viciousness. George Best claimed that the only time he needed to wear shinpads was when he played Leeds. 'I hated playing against them, I really did,' he said. 'They also had a hell of a lot of skill, too, but they were still a bloody nightmare.' When Leeds played Everton in the so-called 'Battle of Goodison' in November 1964, the referee pulled the teams off for a 'cooling-down period' after a chest-high tackle by Willie Bell left Everton's Derek Temple unconscious (Everton's captain, Brian Labone, once told me that he and his colleagues initially thought Bell had killed Temple, so brutal was the assault).

Leeds players always denied they were a dirty side, or that Revie encouraged gamesmanship. 'What was called cynical in this country was called professional when the Italians played it,' Bremner said. Or as Lorimer puts it: 'If a team wanted to mix it with us, we could mix it; if a team wanted to play football, we could play.'

Revie created an attitude within the club not seen before in English football. At the time it was called 'professionalism', but this was no complimentary term; instead it encapsulated the cynicism, physicality and relentlessness of Leeds. Within a few years, other clubs, unable to cope with them in any other way, would try to copy them. To many, Revie is the man who ended English football's age of innocence.


FORTSETTER I NESTE INNLEGG...
« Siste redigering: April 17, 2014, 12:38:07 av Promotion 2010 »

Promotion 2010

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #1 på: November 25, 2007, 11:55:56 »
By the time of their second League title in May 1974, rival fans hated Leeds and their supporters. Revie was widely disliked. 'Don Revie's so-called family had more in keeping with the mafia than Mothercare,' Brian Clough said. But even Clough, who often used his weekly newspaper column to attack Leeds, admitted a grudging respect for Revie's achievements. With many of the great 1960s managers retired or at the end of their careers, Revie was arguably the finest in the country. He was certainly the most successful.

This made him the logical choice for the England manager's job, which Alf Ramsey had vacated in April, and he was appointed on a five-year contract worth £25,000 a year - three times the salary of his predecessor.

On the field, Revie's England started well, with a 3-0 home success in a European Championship qualifier against Czechoslovakia. There was a resounding victory over world champions West Germany and a 5-1 win against Scotland. But England's form grew increasingly patchy and there was unease among the players about Revie. He seemed unable to settle on his best XI, changing his starting line-up every game. 'Strangely he seemed to go the way the press wanted him to go,' Norman Hunter, who played under Revie for both club and country, once recalled. 'He was very strong in his management of Leeds, but with England he seemed to change and I think he tried to pacify the press with his decisions.' Some of his choices were arbitrary: Alan Ball was captain in the last six internationals of the 1974-75 season but was then dropped abruptly and never picked again. Ball told me shortly before his death this April that he was still perplexed about the incident. Nor was the move a success: defeat in Czechoslovakia and a failure to beat Portugal led to qualifying failure.

Revie's team-building exercises - the carpet bowls and indoor golf - were disliked and self-defeating, as half the squad would skulk off to bed rather than sit through another round of bingo. His technical dossiers on opponents were not welcomed either. What was the point, players wondered, of a dozen pages on a Cypriot amateur? Duncan Revie believes there was another, serious, problem. 'He didn't have a Bremner or a Giles and couldn't come to terms with the fact that he didn't have two players like that for the England team.'

Revie's relationship with the FA's volatile chairman, Sir Harold Thompson, had also broken down. 'They genuinely hated each other,' Duncan recalls. 'Thompson was an old Corinthian who always treated the manager like a serf.' At an official dinner, Revie objected to Sir Harold's habit of referring to him by his surname. 'When I get to know you better Revie, I shall call you Don,' Thompson said. Revie retorted: 'When I get to know you better, Thompson, I shall call you Sir Harold.'

England were paired with Italy for the 1978 World Cup qualifiers, with just one nation able to progress. A 2-0 defeat in Rome in November 1976 meant hopes were slim almost from the outset. Three months later Holland humiliated England at Wembley, Johan Cruyff and his team-mates at times toying with the home side - the 2-0 friendly loss was likened by the press to the famous 6-3 defeat by Hungary in 1953.

On the field, Revie's regime reached a crisis that summer. After Scotland beat England 2-1 in the annual Home Internationals fixture, many of the visitors' 30,000 followers invaded the Wembley pitch, ripping up turf, dancing around the penalty areas and snapping crossbars. Italy were closing in on World Cup qualification. The nadir of Don Revie's managerial career had arrived; his disgrace was about to follow.

Writing about Revie in The Football Man, his 1968 journey around the English game, Arthur Hopcraft described him as 'a big flat-fronted man with an outdoors face as if he lives permanently in a keen wind'. His attitude towards the game, wrote Hopcraft, was like 'that of a passionate player'. The impression was that of a typical bluff northerner - loyal, professional, straightforward. His son Duncan, moreover, describes a religious man, attending church each weekend and praying each night, and providing for a wide extended family.

He was also, however, known as 'Don Readies'. His flirtations with wealthy clubs such as Everton while still at Leeds, and his enormous salary as England manager, enhanced a reputation for greed. While in charge of the national team he once demanded £200 from journalists wanting to interview Malcolm Macdonald, after he scored five times against Cyprus, supposedly pocketing the money himself while the striker remained ignorant of the affair.

Certainly money had always been an issue for Revie. As a child of the Depression, his upbringing was set against a backdrop of the Jarrow march and the north-east's industrial decline. He was a player in a time of rolling contracts, tied to a statutory maximum wage of around £20 a week, and his boyhood hero, Wilf Mannion, ended up as a tea boy in a Middlesbrough factory.

Now, in the summer of 1977, he was convinced that the FA were set on replacing him and that they had lined up the Ipswich manager, Bobby Robson, as his successor. So Revie determined to secure his future. On 11 July 1977, Daily Mail readers read that Revie had left the England manager's job. They were the first to know: Revie had sold his story to the Mail for £20,000 and his resignation letter arrived after the FA's Lancaster Gate headquarters had closed the previous night.

Revie claimed that the pressures of being in a job when 'nearly everyone in the country seems to want me out' were simply too unbearable for him and his family. Being England manager, he said, had brought 'too much heartache to those nearest me'. 'He didn't turn down his country,' his lawyer, Gilbert Gray, told me. 'He knew very well that his country, represented by a lot of old fogies who had decided to get rid of him, were about to sack him. He knew damn well he was on his way out.' But on 12 July the Mail announced that Revie was leaving the country to take up a six-year contract worth £340,000, tax-free, to coach the United Arab Emirates national team.

To the public, Revie's crime was not his disloyalty but his greed. It emerged that a month before his 'defection' he had offered to resign as England manager - without mention of his offer from Dubai - in exchange for a £50,000 pay-off. He boasted in the Mail of how he would spend his new salary. 'I will travel to the great sporting events of the world,' he said. 'The major golf tournaments, the Olympics, World Cup finals - whatever takes my fancy.'

Sir Harold Thompson exacted his revenge, charging Revie with bringing the game into disrepute and summoning him to a disciplinary hearing at which he acted as judge and prosecutor; Gilbert Gray, who defended Revie, calls the hearing 'a kangaroo court, an absolute disgrace'. After the disciplinary committee gave out its inevitable guilty verdict, its punishment was severe: a 10-year ban from English football. Revie appealed to the High Court; the ban was overturned, but the judge expressed reservations about Revie's integrity and ordered him to pay two-thirds of his costs. 'Mr Revie... presented to the public a sensational and notorious example of disloyalty, breach of duty, discourtesy and selfishness,' said Justice Cantley. 'His conduct brought English football, at a high level, into disrepute.'

Two months after Revie left the England job, the Daily Mirror alleged that a number of Leeds matches had been fixed over the course of the 1960s and 1970s. Previous allegations by the Sunday People in 1972 had claimed that three unnamed Wolves players were offered £1,000 apiece to throw what would have been a title decider with Leeds, but Wolves had won and neither police nor FA investigations found evidence of wrongdoing. 'Don Revie planned and schemed and offered bribes, leaving as little as possible to chance,' wrote the Mirror's lead reporter, Richard Stott. 'He relied on the loyalty of those he took into his confidence not to talk, and it nearly worked.'

The star witness was Gary Sprake. 'I was quite surprised by the amount of information they had,' Sprake says. 'Richard Stott asked me to get involved, but everything was already written, really.' Sprake told Stott that there had been attempts to fix the Wolves game - a claim he subsequently retracted - as well as several other matches. Jim Barron, the Nottingham Forest goalkeeper, meanwhile said that Billy Bremner had been sent to the Forest dressing room before a game in the 1971 title race to persuade his opponents to 'go easy'. The request was rejected. Alan Ball, meanwhile, revealed clandestine meetings with Revie on Saddleworth Moor in the mid-1960s, when Revie wanted to sign him from Blackpool. Revie also sent weekly £100 bribes to Ball's home as part of his attempt to tap him up. The FA fined Ball £3,000, even though he had ended up at Everton, and not Revie's Leeds.

Bob Stokoe, the Sunderland manager who had outwitted Revie in the 1973 FA Cup final, was the most compelling witness. He said that while managing Bury in 1962, when Leeds were battling relegation, Revie offered him £500 to 'go easy'. When he turned him down, Revie further enraged him by asking to speak to his players.

The notion that a man who left nothing to chance and whose obsessiveness bordered on paranoia would try to fix title- or relegation-deciders was not implausible. But the evidence against Revie is shaky. Sprake had spoken out only after being paid £14,000. The FA deny the existence of a 300-page dossier of allegations supposedly handed over to them by Stott. No criminal or FA charges came out of the match-fixing allegations and, when the Sunday People repeated them, Billy Bremner sued and won £100,000.

'The people who made these accusations - we didn't have to bribe them to be able to beat them,' Peter Lorimer says. 'I was never aware of it and I don't think any of our players were ever aware of it happening. You would think you would get to know if that sort of thing was happening, but certainly we never got to know anything.'

And yet Stokoe, a well liked and widely respected manager, stood to gain nothing by speaking out. He never profited from the allegation, which he repeated hundreds of times before his death in 2004. The thought of it, he said, made him feel ill. 'It always riled me when I see the career Revie has had. At the back of my mind, the bribe is always there. He was always an evil man to me.'

Former team-mates have shunned Gary Sprake for his allegations, but the goalkeeper has since made more. He tells me that Revie asked him to 'tap up' fellow Wales internationals Colin Green and Terry Hennessey when Leeds played Birmingham on the last day of the 1964-65 season. Sprake refused and Leeds drew 3-3, losing the League title to Manchester United on goal average.

Duncan, Revie's son, remains convinced that the allegations were unfounded. 'They must have fixed lots and lots and lots of matches, because they won for at least 10 years,' he says. 'It was ludicrous in the extreme.' If Revie did fix football matches, it was not systematic - and done in a way that was uncharacteristically unprofessional. Duncan believes that 'not suing has wrongly damaged his reputation', because his father's name can never properly be cleared.

He had a great time in the Middle East,' Duncan says. 'It was probably as happy as I've seen my mum and dad. They were relaxed. They enjoyed the sunshine, they enjoyed the golf, they enjoyed Dubai. The friendships that the family made out there still remain to this day.'

When Revie's time in the Middle East came to an end in 1983, he was only in his mid-fifties, but there was no way back into English football. He was, once, mooted as a candidate for the Queens Park Rangers job. In 1986 he moved to his wife's homeland, Scotland. Then came the muscle-wasting illness that would take his life, motor neurone disease. From 1987, it quickly robbed him of all physical abilities. 'Eventually he blinked twice for yes and once for no,' Duncan says. 'He went from 17 stone to eight stone in two years.' At a 1988 charity testimonial at Elland Road, Revie, now in a wheelchair, was reunited with some of his former players. It was the last time they saw him; less than a year later he was dead.

In The Damned Utd, David Peace's novel about Brian Clough's six weeks as Leeds manager, Revie appears as a ghost, stalking out Clough. To many, including Clough, Leeds remained 'Revie's club', and the disdain towards Leeds, 'Dirty Leeds', persists. Few outside Yorkshire lamented their recent relegation to League One - the old Division Three, from which Revie once saved them - and flirtations with bankruptcy.

The club's followers maintain the spirit of defiance that Revie originated - particularly when it comes to the defence of Revie himself. 'For those who know him, have been in his company, and seen what he's done,' Duncan says, 'why should we care what view other people are forming from afar? The people I care about, the family, the Leeds people, the people from Yorkshire, they all know the calibre of the person.' To many Revie remains an enigmatic figure, but the view from Leeds is possibly the truest measure of the man. For no one sums up a manager more accurately than his own supporters, and they are unequivocal in their judgment of Don Revie. To them, quite simply, he was the best.





Hmmmm......

Fin lesning, men litt vondt også. Utrolig så liten anerkjennelse Leeds United og lagets managere har fått etter de fantastiske 60 og 70 årene og ikke minst etter triumfen i 1992. DOL perioden ødela vi selv ved utrolig dårlig økonomisk styring.

Så langt tilbake som til Leeds City, Uniteds forgjenger, da ble den gode perioden rundt 1915, med plasseringer helt i toppen, kronet med nedleggelse av klubben pga økonomisk rot under første verdenskrig.

Når skal vi slippe unna alt dette rotet....?

Kanskje begynner det nå!!!!!!!!!!!!  :)
« Siste redigering: April 17, 2014, 12:36:41 av Promotion 2010 »
Min første Leeds-kamp:
Strømsgodset vs Leeds, 19.september 1973

peacock

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #2 på: November 25, 2007, 12:05:07 »
Revie var vel ikke manager under "Ranet i Serievinnercupen." Og, i 1975, ikke 74.

jarle

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #3 på: November 25, 2007, 12:18:52 »
Stemmer det Påfuglen...1975... 

poenget var vel ikke akkurat hvem som var manager i 75...
men at noen slipper unna annklager de vinner bare for de de er best...
mens Leeds som vant færre titler en de "fortjente" selvsagt jukset seg til de få de vant!!!


Thomas

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #4 på: November 25, 2007, 14:22:05 »
Var interessant lesning ja. Det er jo synd at det nesten bare er Leedssupportere som annerkjenner Revie blant de størte managerene i England. 10 års utestengelse pga a rotet da han slutten som Englandmanager/flyttet til Asia. Heller ingen fra FA deltok i begravelsen, ingen minutts stillhet eller svarte armbånd når ligaen startet opp. Dette hadde vel også muligens litt med å gjøre at han døde nesten 3 mnd før serien startet.

Ellers var det en del jeg ikke visste her. Bla a at  Sparke hadde blitt tatt for fyllekjøring i 71. Han kunne i hvertfall takke Revie for at han slapp billig unna. Skjønner ikke hva han tenkte på da han stilte opp i pressen noen år senere for £ 14 000 og snakket om at Leeds hadde fikset flere kamper på 60 og 70-tallet. Vi kunne vel lese i YEP for et par år siden at han var tilbake på Elland Road for første gang på mange mange år og møtte gamlegutta.


"George Best claimed that the only time he needed to wear shinpads was when he played Leeds. 'I hated playing against them, I really did,' he said. 'They also had a hell of a lot of skill, too, but they were still a bloody nightmare"

Best har vel også selv sagt at Paul Reaney er den eneste backen han har spilt mot som faktisk har hatt noenlunde kontroll på ham. :)



"'Don Revie's so-called family had more in keeping with the mafia than Mothercare"

Hvordan kunne en mann med slike uttaleser ble ansatt som manager?


Visste heller ikke at Stoke med hatten i 73, tidligere var manager for Bury, besylte Revie for å  ha tilbudt ham £ 500 for å "ta lett på en kamp" da Leeds kjempet for opprykk i 62.


"'Eventually he blinked twice for yes and once for no," Ante ikke at han var så syk på slutten.

Jon R

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #5 på: November 25, 2007, 14:48:06 »
Svært interessant lesning og nærmest for pensum å regne for gamle og nye Leeds supportere. Først gjennom historien om Leeds United under Don Revie, har man muligheten til å skjønne bakgrunnen for  "paranoian" og "oss mot resten av verden" mentaliteten som har preget klubben og dets supportere siden tidlig på 60 tallet. For store deler av omverdenen har vi vært "Villdyra fra Yorkshire", på og utenfor banen. Vi har vært ansett som en pest og en plage, men også vært gjenstand for beundring og fascinasjon på en og samme tid. Ikke minst gjør det lettere å forstå den enorme mobiliseringen vi har vært vitne til etter -15 og "summer of hell" . Dagens ledelse har opplagt satt seg inn i denne historien har forstått å bruke den enorme sprengkraften som ligger i " oss mot dem" mentaliteten, for alt det er verdt. Denne kulturen gjennomsyrer nå klubben på godt og vondt. " Villdyret" har våknet.  :)
« Siste redigering: November 25, 2007, 14:56:05 av Jon R »
Jon R.

Thomas

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #6 på: November 25, 2007, 16:14:48 »
FY FANE!!! hører ingen nevne Milano dommeren eller ranet i Serievinnercupen i 74
eller alle de andre dommertabbene som fratokk oss titler!!!

Nå viste de for øvrig glimt fra samtlige VM-finaler siden 58 på NRK2. I 74-finalen fikk Nederland straffe mot Vest Tyskland. Vi så Bekkenbauer gå bort for å snakke med dommeren. Det var dessverre mer vellykket året etter i Paris som du nevnte over her..

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #7 på: November 26, 2007, 11:23:16 »
Vi har aldri fått vår fotjente ros etter våre store år! Men, la oss ikke sutre pga. det. Vi får bare forstette å stå sammen for Leeds United! MOT!!!!!
Yeboahs vitne

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Sv: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #8 på: November 26, 2007, 11:28:25 »
Sjøl må jeg innrømme at jeg liker denne oss-mot-alle greia. Ikke i at vi skal anses som en gjeng pøbler fra Yorkshire eller at vi spiller ligaens styggeste fotball, men det bidrar til at supporterne holder sammen og en ekstrem lagfølelse.  :)

Hadde jeg kommet inn i et rom fullt av Liverpool-supportere der alle var bekjente av meg, hadde jeg gladelig satt meg ned hos den ene Leeds-supporteren i samme rom.  8)
Marching on together!

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Don Revie
« Svar #9 på: Mai 26, 2009, 20:39:41 »
Idag är det 20 år sedan Leed största dog.

Don Revie gone, but never forgotten.

http://leedsunited.se/0068.html
 

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #10 på: Mai 26, 2009, 20:42:59 »
Never forgotten


Marching on together!

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #11 på: Mai 26, 2009, 21:02:47 »
RIP.

STOR mann
januar 3. remember the date. we beat the team that we f@*kin hate. we knocked the scum out the FA cup. we`re super leeds and we`re goin up!!!!!

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #12 på: Mai 26, 2009, 22:03:17 »
Never forgotten - RIP !
COME ON LEEDS !!

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #13 på: Mai 26, 2009, 22:24:14 »
Never forgotten - RIP !

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #14 på: Mai 27, 2009, 14:23:47 »
Don Revie kommer alltid til å bli husket for sine bragder!!! RIP!
Yeboahs vitne

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #15 på: Mai 27, 2009, 15:29:05 »
DEN STØRSTE I LEEDS UNITED SIN HISTORIE!!

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #16 på: Mai 27, 2009, 20:01:31 »
Never forgotten - RIP !

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #17 på: Mai 28, 2009, 11:36:55 »
Don, du vil aldri bli glemt!
Happy days are here again, it's official from Number 10!

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #18 på: Mai 10, 2013, 09:19:10 »
Min første Leeds-kamp:
Strømsgodset vs Leeds, 19.september 1973

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Sv: Don Revie
« Svar #19 på: Mai 21, 2013, 00:27:52 »
Mer Revie:
 http://www.weallloveleeds.co.uk/20/post/2013/05/shameful-bbc-spit-on-don-revies-grave.html

Fotballforbundet er ikke gode! BBC er ikke gode!
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Strømsgodset vs Leeds, 19.september 1973

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #21 på: April 17, 2014, 12:41:32 »
NEWS
REVIE RUNS AWAY WITH IT
See how your votes counted...

PUBLISHED 17 APRIL 2014 AT 11:00

Don Revie was the runaway winner as Leeds United’s greatest ever manager by the club’s fans in a poll conducted as part of The Football League's 125th Anniversary celebrations.

Revie’s first job in management was as player-boss at Elland Road, a role he took on in 1961 before hanging up his boots to concentrate on his managerial duties and completely revolutionising the club’s fortunes and approach to football.

Within three years we were champions of the Second Division and once in the top flight we never finished below fourth under Revie. His list of honours includes two First Division titles and five runners-up spots, the Second Division championship, the FA Cup, the League Cup, two Inter-Cities Fairs Cup wins and a run to the European Cup Winners’ Cup Final of 1973.

On a personal note, Revie was made an OBE in 1969 and also named Manager of the Year on three occasions. All that saw him rack up 74% of the vote, ahead of Simon Grayson and Howard Wilkinson.

But the tally for the man voted as the club’s greatest captain was even greater as Billy Bremner clocked up 81%. Bremner was the skipper right through the Revie era and made 772 appearances for the club between 1960 and 1976, winning a long list of honours on the way. He finished ahead of Lucas Radebe and Gordon Strachan in the captain voting.

It was a game under Revie in 1972 that was voted as the club’s greatest, a memorable 7-0 victory over Southampton at Elland Road which polled 43% of the votes, ahead of a 5-4 defeat at home to Liverpool in 1991, the promotion-clinching 2-1 win at home to Bristol Rovers in 2010, the 3-2 win at Sheffield United that clinched us the First Division title in 1992 and a 1-0 win at Bournemouth in 1990 that saw us promoted from the Second Division.

The league title-winning campaign of 1991/92, the last before the advent of the new Premier League, was voted as our best season with almost half of all votes cast. It beat 1967/68, 1989/90, 2009/10 and 2007/08 to the honour.

Revie and Bremner sit alongside other legends of the game including Brian Clough, Sir Bobby Robson, Sir Tom Finney, Billy Wright, Sir Stanley Matthews, Trevor Francis and Herbert Chapman who have all been named in a list of the greatest contributors to clubs’ league history in a vote as part of The Football League’s 125th Anniversary celebrations.

The names feature in lists for each of the current 72 Football League clubs’ greatest in various categories including managers, players, captains, fan favourites, matches and seasons. The polls were run by The Football League to celebrate each club’s own contribution to the last 125 years of league football. The results have been announced on the anniversary of The Football League’s formation on 17th April 1888 to bring down the curtain on a year of activity celebrating the start of the world’s original league football competition.

Nearly 100,000 votes were cast in the polls after clubs were first invited to compile their own shortlist for each category based on fans’ nominations via social media.

A list of the winners in each category can be seen at www.FL125.co.uk/vote , and a club-by-club breakdown for each vote with more detail on the winners can be seen at www.fl125.co.uk/leeds-united .

Supporters can find out more about The Football League’s 125th Anniversary at www.FL125.co.uk.  Fans also still have a chance to visit a special exhibition called ‘Game Changers’ at the National Football Museum in Manchester celebrating 125 years of The Football League, with contributions from every club.  The exhibition is free to enter and open 7 days a week – for more details click here .

BACK TO NEWS
- See more at: http://www.leedsunited.com/news/article/1q252qtwowu2x1hvdvmxha5ljr/title/revie-runs-away-with-it?#sthash.0bukCLA2.dpuf
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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #22 på: Mai 26, 2014, 12:54:57 »
25 år siden han gikk brot:

http://roblufc.org/2014/05/26/revie-the-don-of-elland-road/


Taken From Us 25 Years Ago Today: Revie, The Don of Elland Road – by Rob Atkinson

Posted on 26/05/2014 | 8 Comments

The Don – the Greatest
 
They say that great players don’t always make great managers, and Bobby Charlton is a stand-out example of that essential truth.  His brother Jack, by common consent not anything like the player Bobby was, but ten times the bloke, was by far the more successful manager.  Then again – he learned from the best.
 
And they will twist the argument around to show that average players can make great managers. We’re usually invited by a brainwashed and indoctrinated media to take Alex Ferguson as an example of this; my own choice would be Arsene Wenger, a deeply average player but a highly superior coach, tactician and innovator who made a significant dent in the Man U monopoly of the Premier League – despite the vast off-field advantages of the Salford club. Remember Wenger’s “Invincibles”?  There is also, of course, Jose Mourinho – and many others who pulled up no trees as players, but blossomed into legendary managers.
 
But there are a select few examples of truly great players who went on to be truly great managers – the likes of Busby and Dalglish, for instance – and I will argue passionately to my last breath that the best of the best was Donald George Revie, who died of Motor Neurone Disease 25 years ago today.
 
Don Revie was an innovative, thinking footballer, the pivot of the famous “Revie Plan” at Manchester City when he was the first to exploit deep-lying centre-forward play to great effect as City hit the heights in the mid to late fifties. He was instrumental in the Wembley defeat of Birmingham City in the FA Cup Final of 1956, and also helped restore English pride after two batterings by Hungary – the Magnificent Magyars having trounced England 6-3 at Wembley and 7-1 in Budapest. Revie’s adapted attacking role helped the National team annihilate Scotland 7-2 and his reputation was made as a selfless team player who was adept at making the ball do the work while team-mates found space as he dropped deep, baffling the defences of the time.
 
Revie was clearly a thinker, and developed very definite ideas about the game during his playing career, ideas he would later put into practice to devastating effect as a club manager. It is undeniable that, during his thirteen years in charge at Leeds, he elevated them from simply nowhere in the game to its very pinnacle, preaching togetherness and the team ethic above all else. Respected judges within the game have described the football played by Leeds at their peak as unmatched, before or since. In the eyes of many, that Leeds United team were the finest English side ever, a unit of grisly efficiency and teak-hardness yet capable of football which was outstandingly, breathtakingly beautiful, intricate in its conception and build-up, devastating in its effect.
 
Here is the scale of Revie’s achievement: in an era before the advent of lavish sponsorship and advanced commercial operations, he built a club from the ground upwards – a club with an apathetic support, which had hardly two ha’pennies to rub together, and whose prime asset was a group of raw but promising youngsters. The way that Revie nurtured those youngsters, moulding them into a team of supreme talent and majestic ability, is the stuff of legend. In some cases, he had to ward off the threats of homesickness: a young Billy Bremner was determined to go home to his native Scotland and Revie arranged for his girlfriend to move to Leeds, helping the lad settle down. Sometimes he had to adapt a player from one position to another – Terry Cooper was an indifferent winger who was made into a world-class overlapping full-back. Examples of his inspirational and man-management skills are many; he wrote the modern managerial manual from scratch.
 
Revie raised almost an entire squad from the junior ranks through to full international status, but he also had an unerring eye for a transfer market bargain. He took Bobby Collins from Everton, and saw the diminutive veteran midfielder produce the best form of his career. He lured a disaffected John Giles from Old Trafford where he was an under-rated performer. Giles swore that he would “haunt” Matt Busby, the manager who let him go, and Revie enabled this vow to be realised, converting Giles to a more central role after the end of Collins’ first team career. Giles and Bremner would form an almost telepathic central midfield partnership for Leeds, carrying all before them over the muddy battlefields of Division One. Revie later described his recruitment of Giles from Man U as “robbery with violence”.
 
As the sixties wore on, the Don would add Mick Jones and Allan Clarke to his formidable squad while it grew up together in a family atmosphere at Elland Road. Rarely if ever before or since can a manager have been so involved in his team’s welfare and well-being, no mere tracksuit manager this. There would be flowers and chocolates when a girlfriend or wife celebrated a birthday, a listening ear and helping hand whenever problems threatened to affect a player’s form. Revie was a father figure to his players for over a decade, forming a bond of mutual loyalty and respect that still sets the standard for enlightened management today.
 
Don Revie has been described in scornful terms by the ignorant, as a dossier-obsessed and over-superstitious manager by some people of insight and judgement, and as simply the best by his players who still survive from that amazing period of Leeds United’s dominance at home and abroad. He was perhaps too reliant on lucky suits and the lifting of gypsy curses, and other such supernatural preoccupations. He could maybe have let his team “off the leash” a little earlier than he did – when given full rein, they were next door to unstoppable. But it’s hard to hold the caution and superstition of the man against him; this was a time unlike today when livelihoods depended on a bounce of the ball, when results mattered in a bread and butter way. There were no cossetted millionaires then, no examples of young men who could pack it all in tomorrow and live in luxury for the rest of their lives. It all meant so much more in those days and the word “pressure” had real resonance.
 
The modern coaches have greats among their number, there’s no doubt about that. It would be invidious to single out names; after all, the media in a misguided fit of uncritical and commercially-motivated hero-worship have been busily engaged for most of the last three decades in dubbing “S’ralex” as the greatest ever. But the legend that is Don Revie can sit comfortably on his laurels, the man who – more than any other – took a sow’s ear of a football club and made of it a purse of the very finest silk which yet concealed a core of Yorkshire steel.
 
Donald George Revie (1927 – 1989) – Simply The Best.
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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #24 på: Juli 10, 2014, 11:37:34 »
Gratulerer med dagen, Revie! :)
Noen mennesker tror at fotball gjelder liv eller død. Jeg liker ikke den innstillingen. Det er atskillig mer alvorlig enn som så. - Bill Shankly

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #25 på: Februar 25, 2015, 23:19:09 »
Her er en ganske interessant fotnote:

Da Matt Busby døde i 1994 ble det beordret ett minutts stillhet på alle de engelske banene. Leedsfansen reagerte med dette:

@MartinMarty1974: SCUM OF THE EARTH!
A minority of Leeds fans spoil Matt Busbys minutes silence & the press go 2 town on the club again http://t.co/Q7h8KLCH7E


Grunnen til at Leedsfansen pep og ropte gjennom denne markeringen kan spores tilbake til mai og august 1989, altså fem år tidligere.

Da Don Revie gikk bort, så altfor tidlig av en variant av ALS, i mai 1989 valgte The Football League å IKKE markere dette i det hele tatt. Til tross for at Revie også var en tidligere engelsk landslagsmanager så ble det ingen markering andre steder enn på Elland Road i august sesongen etter - som var første anledning.

Nok et eksempel på den enorme forskjellsbehandlingen som Leeds United var og fortsatt er utsatt for.

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #26 på: Mars 13, 2015, 17:08:28 »
@LeedsUtdPics: 54 years ago today, Don Revie was appointed as manager of 2nd division side Leeds United. The rest is history. #lufc http://t.co/b5v2B5ax9v

 :)
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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #27 på: Mars 13, 2015, 17:10:58 »
THE DON REVIE STORY

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=-5wFqZ6cEvY


Fredagskos!   8)
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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #28 på: Mai 21, 2015, 21:26:30 »
Revie var selvsagt med å skape den moderne fotballen:

http://spoughts.co.uk/2015/05/21/leeds-united-don-revie-helped-invent-modern-game/?

 :)
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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #29 på: Juli 03, 2015, 00:02:08 »


Dave Cocker ‏@CockerDave  · 5m5 minutes ago 
Don Revie dossier, on #lufc after he left ( I own the original)

Dave er vel verdt å følge på twitter, han poster drøssevis av gamle foto han finner i farens arkiv
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