Skrevet av Emne: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned  (Lest 10840 ganger)

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #30 på: Mai 26, 2016, 21:41:14 »
Vi har vel altfor lite samlet i denne tråden, men her er litt i anledning 27 år siden han døde!


https://audioboom.com/boos/4616960-don-revie-remembered-lufc-ripdon

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Strømsgodset vs Leeds, 19.september 1973

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #31 på: Mai 26, 2016, 21:42:04 »
Min første Leeds-kamp:
Strømsgodset vs Leeds, 19.september 1973

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #32 på: Mai 26, 2016, 21:43:40 »
Don Revie bygget en respektabel ut av ingenting!

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #34 på: September 30, 2016, 18:54:30 »
Dons eneste sønn, Duncan, døde på søndag. :(

Hans sønn igjen, Aidan, skrev i dag følgende om faren:
It is with a sadness that I am currently unable to understand, or articulate, that I need to inform you of the death of my father, Duncan Revie, who died peacefully in London on Sunday 25thSeptember with his family around him. He fought a short yet ferocious battle against a horrible disease that touches all of us, yet against the odds scrapped for every single solitary inch before finally being overcome by it. He may not have ultimately won, but the opposition sure as hell knew it had been in a fight.
 
Many of you have met him at some point, so knew him to be the confident, evanescent, caring, loving man that he was. If it was within his power to do something for someone else, he would do it without question. He was the eternal optimist, calm in a crisis and always ready to deliver sage life advice when needed. Family and friends were everything to him and it is hard to imagine how we carry on without him. However, I am glad for the life that came before, as he was one of very few people who truly, truly lived. I don’t think he would have changed a minute of it.
 
The club have kindly agreed to hold a minutes applause before the match tomorrow, which the family would like to thank them for.
 
If you are at the match tomorrow I would ask you to sing your hearts out for him, and in any scenario please raise a glass to him this evening.
 
I am going to leave you with some words of his I found in an interview while I was trawling the net this week –
 
‘I’m still a Leeds United fan. Once Leeds, always Leeds, - you can’t get away from it! Although the great times of the late 60’s and early 70’s have not yet been repeated, Leeds fans, who incidentally ARE the best in the world, never give up hope that we will be back at the top of the mountain sooner rather than later. As the song goes ‘at least until the world stops turning round’
 
MOT
 
Aidan
- waccoe

Positivt at klubben velger å hedre også flere generasjoner Revie! :)

« Siste redigering: September 30, 2016, 18:57:35 av Asbjørn »
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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #35 på: September 30, 2016, 19:18:15 »
R.I.P. Duncan.
In Bielsa I trust.

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #36 på: September 30, 2016, 20:13:40 »
Så trist lesing.. Hvil i fred Revie #2...

auren
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Marcelo Bielsa, 16.01.19, etter Spygate-foredraget sitt.

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #37 på: September 30, 2016, 23:47:50 »
R.I.P Duncan.

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #38 på: Oktober 19, 2016, 16:22:07 »
Ikke mange bilder jeg har sett av Elsie


LEEDS UTD MEMORIES ‏@MartinMarty1974  7h
7 hours ago
Don and Elsie Revie another great partnership @super_leeds70 @FollowMeAndLUFC @WACCOE @lufcstats @Brac4773 @LeedsUnited_MAD @ardo90_LUFC
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Or has it died out and melted like the snow
Tell me  Tell me

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #39 på: Desember 31, 2016, 14:12:21 »
Don Revie!
...men hvordan uttales det? Opp gjennom har jeg hørt flere uttalels-varianter uten at noen har gitt meg 'fasiten'.

Men nå kommer den? :)

1.Don Re-vi er mest vanlig. Og, har jeg nå lest, slik Yorkshire uttalte etternavnet hans.

2.Don Ri-vi er slik Dons familie uttalte det. Og noen få andre...

Her er litt fra waccoe:
Now I know there'll be some on here wanting to argue just for arguing's sake, and there'll be some who disagree with this too.
 
It's one of those things which has bugged me for as long as I can remember - how to pronounce the great Don's surname.  I've been convinced since I was a kid that the correct way to say it is 'Reevi' but over the years so many media pundits and Leeds fans say, sing even, 'Revvi'.  It gets more mystifying when some, most of the Super Leeds players say it that way too.  
 
Well waccoe friends & associates, I can categorically, officially and with absolute certainty tell you that the way to pronounce it is indeed 'Reevi'.  So can we agree on here and try to change the minds of those who keep saying it wrong?
 
MOT

....

It was always going to be Revie as in Bevvy in Yorkshire, our songs get shortened to chants.
 
But the great man himself when questioned on the very subject of the pronunciation of his surname stated that it was 'Reevie' the pronunciation not the spelling. So, a bit of a non story and thread really.

....

I never ever referred to him as Reevi though and we never sang about him that way always Revie. I may have to accept that I've sung it wrong for 50 years but he will always be known as Revie to me as part of our history. I can't remember anyone coming out and say the Kop was singing his name wrong, being the gentleman he was, probably accepted the Yorkshire pronunciation of it

...

t's one of those things which has bugged me for as long as I can remember - how to pronounce the great Don's surname.  I've been convinced since I was a kid that the correct way to say it is 'Reevi' but over the years so many media pundits and Leeds fans say, sing even, 'Revvi'.  It gets more mystifying when some, most of the Super Leeds players say it that way too.  
 
The answer to your non question in a non entity of a thread is Reevie - if you go on YT you will find a Calendar interview with him stating how he pronounces it. Now get some sleep, come back next year with something more interesting to say. As for singing it or pronouncing it, we are Leeds and we do what we want!
 
...

I always thought/pronounced it as Revvi for many years but then read in a book (think it may have been The Unforgiven but I'm not sure) that it was Reevie and that the great man used to get angry if people pronounced it incorrectly - I don't think we are talking about the chants and fans though, I think more football pundits and, in particular, the twats at the FA...some of whom used to pronounce it wrong deliberately because they knew it wound him up...even when he was England manager.
 
I bet he and Billy are enjoying this season.
...

Everyone pronounces it wrong including me. But I have spoken his Granddaughter, same surname and it's definitely reeve-y
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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #40 på: Juni 21, 2018, 17:53:15 »
The pioneer black manager who became Don Revie's 'superspy'

When he managed Rochdale back in the early Sixties, Tony Collins earned £1,500 a year. Fifty-four years on, as he sits reminiscing in a care home in Manchester, there are two managers in the very city where he is speaking who each earn £10 million a year. But he is not remotely resentful.

“I don’t begrudge them getting good money,” he says. “Because we were exploited. Oh dear, were we exploited. When I was a player, if Stan Matthews was in town, you could guarantee the gates would be locked. The crowds flocked to see him. Or Tom Finney, or Wilfy Mannion. What players they were. Artists, entertainers. But they never got the money.”

 Tony Collins, photographed in his retirement home, became England's first black manager in 1960
Tony Collins, photographed in his retirement home, became England's first black manager in 1960 Credit: Jon Super for The Telegraph
Things might have changed financially from his day, but one thing has not: ethnic minority managers remain a scandalous rarity. In that respect, Collins was a pioneer. The assumption has long been that Keith Alexander was the first black or mixed-race manager in the Football League when he took charge of Lincoln City in 1993.

The truth is Collins had done it three decades earlier when he managed Rochdale for five seasons, steering the club to the most significant point in their history, when they reached the League Cup final in 1962. His team remain one of only two fourth-tier sides ever to contest a cup final (they lost 4-0 to Norwich over two legs). And he insists he never faced any sort of barrier – spoken or unspoken – to his progress.

Collins in his prime as a winger Credit: Jon Super for The Telegraph
“Prejudice? I didn’t have time to worry about that. I was working too hard,” he says. “I don’t think it held me back. I worked with some of the best people in the game. Big Ron [Atkinson], Don Revie, Jock Stein they all gave me jobs. Prejudice? No. Nothing. Nothing at all.”

Collins’s story, told in a new book co-authored by his daughter Sarita, is an extraordinary one. He was born in Kensington during the general strike in 1926, his 17-year-old mother refusing to identify his father on his birth certificate. One thing was immediately obvious, however: his dad was black. Mixed-race children were an unusual sight in London in the 1920s. But his mother’s parents adopted him and brought him up in the then tough environs of the Portobello Road.

A telegram from Don Revie sent to Tony Collins before his testimonial at Ashton Gate Credit: Jon Super for The Telegraph
He excelled at football at school. A quick, skilful winger, he was due to sign for Brentford but wartime duty intervened. He served three years in Italy and when he was demobbed some fellow soldiers who had seen him play in Army fixtures wrote to their hometown club of Sheffield Wednesday demanding he be signed. In 1947 he was picked up by the Hillsborough club, his every mention in newspaper match reports collected by the man he called dad, but who was actually his grandfather.

“My dad used to go out to the library and cut the pieces out the paper,” he recalls of the archive of yellowing press clippings his daughter has spread across his bed ahead of this interview.

Collins, outside left, and his Watford team-mates Credit: Jon Super for The Telegraph
One of them refers to a visit to watch him play in 1954 by the then England manager, Walter Winterbottom, who was drawn by reports of the quicksilver winger who was by then at Watford. But he never got a call-up. Sarita suggests there may have been unspoken prejudice involved in the decision. Her father prefers to believe it was the England manager’s myopia.

“After the game my manager said to him: ‘What did you think?’ He said in that snooty way he had: ‘He’s got a lot to learn’. And my manager said: ‘Yeah Walter, so have you’. We used to call him Walter Shufflebottom.”

Without an international call-up, his playing career ended at Rochdale, where he found himself put in charge of team matters almost accidentally

Tony Collins' testimonial programme from his collection Credit: Jon Super for The Telegraph
“The manager was going to Blackburn and all the players said to me I should apply. But I’d missed the cut-off date. Before he left, the manager said I should put a back-dated application in. Next thing I know I was down at the chairman’s office and within half an hour I had the job.”

It might be thought the very fact he got the position was evidence of the game’s openness to minorities. But Sarita explains, out of her father’s hearing, that she has a file of 13 job applications he had made during his time at Rochdale which were unearthed by the National Football Museum. There he was, having done the impossible and taken a fourth-tier club to a cup final, yet he received not one reply to any of them. Whether that was because of institutional racism or institutional incompetence, it is impossible to say. And the fiercely proud Collins, his daughter says, would prefer not to find excuses.

“People who knew what they were talking about thought I was doing something right,” he says. “That’s good enough for me.”

Tony Collins, back right, lines up with Alex Ferguson and the other members of Manchester United's staff in a picture from his collection Credit: Jon Super for The Telegraph
Whatever the cause of his stalled career, after five years he had tired of trying to spin a silk purse from an impoverished sow’s ear and resigned as Rochdale boss.

“It was a very, very difficult job,” he says. “I never had a moment off. Every night I was watching a game. I’d go and watch reserves play, hoping there was someone there I might get on the cheap. The thing I most remember my wife saying was: ‘You’re a bit late tonight’.”

After he left Spotland he remained employed in the game for another 30 years, first as assistant manager at Bristol City, then as Don Revie’s chief scout at Leeds, charged not only with finding new talent, but with analysing the opposition. When Revie took up the England job, he employed Collins to help him compile the dossiers he would hand to players.

“Before a game with Scotland, one of them left his in the lobby of the hotel. A kid picked it up and leaked it to the Scottish press,” he recalls.

The result was a double-page spread in the Daily Record lamenting the fact Scotland did not have the same resources as their opponents. “How come we don’t have spies like this?” read the headline.

And Collins was soon dubbed “Football’s Superspy”, the James Bond of the game, renowned for the manner in which he surreptitiously compiled information. It was a reputation that saw him recruited in the 1980s by Ron Atkinson as chief scout at Manchester United.

“Ron sent me to Holland once, told me to go to check out this young centre-back. When I came back, he said: ‘How’d it go, Tone?’ I said: ‘He’s bang average, but that right-back is something special. Turned out we were talking about the same player: Ruud Gullit was playing full-back that night. What a player. Shame we never signed him.”

When Alex Ferguson arrived at Old Trafford, Collins stayed in his job for a couple of years, bringing Lee Sharpe to the club, before he was fired. “It’s what you expect when a new manager comes in, he wants his own people. But I didn’t like what he said. He claimed the scouting system was rubbish. Really? Mark Hughes, Norman Whiteside, Paul McGrath, Lee Sharpe: was that rubbish?”

Collins eventually retired from a position as part-time scout at Leeds United just 13 years ago, at the age of 77. And he still loves the game, particularly watching the modern Arsenal play. “I like the way they pass the ball, ping, ping, ping,” he says. “That’s nice.”

And he smiles, delighted that whatever the monetary inflation, the game’s true values remain intact.

‘Tony Collins: Football Masterspy’ by Quentin Cope and Sarita Collins is available from bookguild.co.uk

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #41 på: Juni 25, 2018, 18:49:23 »
How Don Revie and Leeds United invented the modern British game

By Amitai Winehouse (@awinehouse1)

When Andre Villas Boas was appointed Chelsea manager in 2011, social media went wild over old scouting reports he had written several years earlier. He was hailed as a new found genius, the Premier League’s new prodigy. The documents that ended up on Twitter were detailed, analytical, clever, and nothing new.

In 1961, Leeds United appointed Don Revie as their manager. Revie, who passed away in 1989, had shown his ability to look at football thoughtfully while still a player - when he was at Manchester City, the 1956 FA Cup Final was won by employing the famous Revie plan, based on the role played by Hungary’s Nandor Hidegkuti. Revie was deployed as a deep-lying centre forward, something unique in the English game at the time.

Revie went on to become the most important manager in Leeds United’s history, but while he is revered in West Yorkshire, he is reviled elsewhere in the country. His team were associated with what were seen as footballing dark arts, but many of these have become a normal part of what we see in the modern game.

Eddie Gray

Eddie was a key player in Revie's side. Widely regarded as an ultra-talented winger, he has since managed Leeds United and currently works for the club's in-house media channels.

Peter Lorimer

"Lasher" Lorimer is Leeds United's top scorer of all time, despite retiring from football in the 1980s. He played on the right side of midfield for Revie's side, and was well known for his powerful shot.

“We couldn’t get intimidated, it never worried us.”

Scouting

Once viewed as wrong, there is now no modern side that doesn’t analyse the opposition before a game. Revie was the first manager to introduce these, using coach Syd Owen as his spy. Leeds’s Peter Lorimer, who was part of Revie’s side, explained that the manager did it as part of an obligation to his players.

“He felt that if we conceded a goal and it was something he hadn’t told us, he’d let us down,” Lorimer told me. “He made sure his side was covered. The dossiers were very intense. Don was a believer in his players going out to perform, but he also wanted us to know everything about our opposition. We’d get a complete dossier on everything they did - free kicks, corners - and any weaknesses we could play on. In training, we’d work on exactly what to do and what to expect. We were basically prepared for everything the opposition might do to us. You can get caught out, especially against foreign opposition. Syd went all over to watch the opposition so we knew what to expect. They weren’t doing that to us - Don was one of the first to bring that into the sport.”

Eddie Gray, who played on the wing for Revie and later managed the Elland Road side, echoed Lorimer’s words, adding: “Don got criticised for the dossiers when he went to manage England, but for us, they were part of our footballing education. He always had people going to games, analysing players and then he would show us where we could hurt the opposition.”

Sport Science

While the dossiers are relatively infamous because of how they were seen at the time, one aspect of Revie’s innovations that has rarely been discussed is his use of team doctor Ian Adams. Arsene Wenger was highly praised for banning food like red meat, eggs and chips at Arsenal in the mid-1990s, but a throwaway comment from Lorimer revealed that Leeds had taken a new approach to player diets in the sixties.

“Don was one of the first managers to bring a doctor into the setup. Dr Adams made sure we were one of the first teams to work on diets and what to eat before games. We would have chicken and things like that. We ate the food that gave you energy. Before that, footballers ate a steak before a match.”

Man Management

Many modern managers are especially praised for their man management, especially Jose Mourinho and the retired Sir Alex Ferguson, who undeniably changed sides through excellent motivational work, and Revie had that in his locker as well. Revie imbued his players with self-belief.

Imagine a side losing the title on the last day of the season because they had won an FA Cup final only two days before and were fatigued. Imagine that side then losing the FA Cup final the next season to rank outsiders, despite dominating the game, in one of the greatest cup upsets of all time. Imagine that side, with no additions, then coming back stronger to win the championship the next season, racking up a then-record 29 consecutive games undefeated in the process. Leeds did that in 1973-74. They had to believe they were superior and not be knocked back. Revie instilled that.


Gray admitted the team always believed they would win, saying: “We thought Peter was a big threat, the players in the side made sure that he got plenty of the ball. If Don thought I was the avenue to hurt the opposition, Johnny Giles and Billy Bremner made sure I got on the ball. It was nearly always proactive with us. We thought we had great players. You just had to look around the dressing room and see the players that were sitting with us.”

“When we played anybody, no matter, we expected to win,” Lorimer added, “because Don bred major confidence in the team. When a lot of teams go abroad and go away, they look not to lose - we went to win the game. We couldn’t get intimidated by opposition, it never worried us. We had a group of lads who were prepared to step up.”

“Don’s philosophy was you had to master the ball.”

Tactics

Revie, showing the astuteness that allowed the Revie Plan to work, was respected by his side for his tactical innovations. He moved Billy Bremner from the traditional outside right role to central midfield, revitalising his nascent career by pairing him with Johnny Giles to form a formidable duo. He also stressed the importance of possession football. This was best demonstrated in the 7-0 defeat of Southampton in 1971/72, when Leeds ended the game toying with the Saints, passing the ball around them.


Gray, who concluded that passage of play with a sublime heel-flick pass, finished by telling me: “The most important thing in the game is the ball, and Don’s philosophy was you had to master the ball. The more possession of the ball you had, the less the opposition had, the more chance you had of winning the game. The great belief was if you got the ball, you kept it. We would try and go forward, but if not we kept it.”

As poorly as Don Revie has been regarded by history, the reality of football’s present suggests his outlook had more in common with modern greats than most believe. If you want to understand how football became the game we know today, Revie’s Leeds are a good starting point.


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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #43 på: September 10, 2018, 16:45:36 »
Slik annonserte man etter etterfølgeren i 1974:

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« Svar #44 på: September 10, 2018, 21:51:06 »
Leeds United Memories

July 1974, Newspaper article on the runners and riders for the Leeds United Managers job. #Leeds


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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #45 på: September 12, 2018, 18:48:36 »
Etter 44 dager......kanskje:


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« Svar #46 på: September 13, 2018, 21:24:15 »
Revie som trener:

Min første Leeds-kamp:
Strømsgodset vs Leeds, 19.september 1973

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« Svar #47 på: Desember 03, 2019, 20:10:38 »
I forbindelse med 100-årsmarkeringen gav Leeds City Council (kommunen) Leedslaget rundt de to seriegullene Honorary Freedom of the City of Leeds-medaljen.

I morgen markeres denne begivenheten med en æresmiddag.

Leeds-Live har fått fatt i gjestelisten, igjen er det Moscowhite som rapporterer:

Here's news of a proper honour; the Don Revie team of 1967-74 will formally receive Honorary Freedom of the City of Leeds on Wednesday afternoon. Leeds Live report this guest list:
Norman Hunter, Johnny Giles, Allan Clarke, Mick Jones, Paul Reaney, Frank Gray, Gordon McQueen, Mick Bates, Mike O’Grady, Chris Galvin, Eddie Gray, David Harvey and Trevor Cherry are all set to attend, alongside family members of Don Revie, Paul Madeley and Bobby Collins.
The award doesn't end with them — I think I'm allowed to say one of the organisers emailed me ahead of this trying to verify information about backroom staff members from the era. I didn't have a bloody clue but they straightened it out in the end.

- betyr det at Peter Lorimer ikke er i form til å delta??? Han var jo til stede under hundreårsmarkeringen...
At Jackie Charlton ikke har helse til å være til stede vet vi jo.
« Siste redigering: Desember 03, 2019, 20:12:44 av Asbjørn »
Tell me - I've got to know
Tell me - Tell me before I go
Does that flame still burn, does that fire still glow
Or has it died out and melted like the snow
Tell me  Tell me

Dylan

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Sv: LEGENDEN: DON REVIE - king of the damned
« Svar #48 på: Desember 03, 2019, 23:43:45 »
I forbindelse med 100-årsmarkeringen gav Leeds City Council (kommunen) Leedslaget rundt de to seriegullene Honorary Freedom of the City of Leeds-medaljen.

I morgen markeres denne begivenheten med en æresmiddag.

Leeds-Live har fått fatt i gjestelisten, igjen er det Moscowhite som rapporterer:

Here's news of a proper honour; the Don Revie team of 1967-74 will formally receive Honorary Freedom of the City of Leeds on Wednesday afternoon. Leeds Live report this guest list:
Norman Hunter, Johnny Giles, Allan Clarke, Mick Jones, Paul Reaney, Frank Gray, Gordon McQueen, Mick Bates, Mike O’Grady, Chris Galvin, Eddie Gray, David Harvey and Trevor Cherry are all set to attend, alongside family members of Don Revie, Paul Madeley and Bobby Collins.
The award doesn't end with them — I think I'm allowed to say one of the organisers emailed me ahead of this trying to verify information about backroom staff members from the era. I didn't have a bloody clue but they straightened it out in the end.

- betyr det at Peter Lorimer ikke er i form til å delta??? Han var jo til stede under hundreårsmarkeringen...
At Jackie Charlton ikke har helse til å være til stede vet vi jo.

Får inderlig håpe den godeste Peter henger med noen år til.. Kanskje eneste spiller fra man ble Leeds-fan tidlig 70-tall som man har digget klart mer en de andre..siden har det vært LAGET man har elsket..men det var noe helt spesielt med Lorimer..antagelig skuddfoten!! :D

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Tell me - I've got to know
Tell me - Tell me before I go
Does that flame still burn, does that fire still glow
Or has it died out and melted like the snow
Tell me  Tell me

Dylan